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Prioritization of indigenous fruit trees/shrubs for domestication in northern Guinea savanna, Taraba State, Nigeria

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Farmer-managed natural regeneration (FMNR) on Nigeria's drylands: the influence of changing climate on agroforestry trees management
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    In Northern Nigeria, prolonged drought critically affects parkland tree regeneration and reduces land productivity and income. However, documentation of parkland trees management in extreme climatic conditions is scarce in the region. Hence, the need to evaluate the management via tree preferences by farmers on Nigeria’s dry agroecological zones (AEZ). To address this, field surveys were conducted in nine villages along a north-south transect, with precipitation increasing southwards through three AEZ of Nigeria: Sudan Savannah (SS), Northern Guinea Savannah (NGS) and Southern Guinea Savannah (SGS). Using Open Data Kit (ODK), information from 92 respondents and 4 focused groups relating to tree regeneration management were collected and aggregated. These include the abundance of the most preferred trees on farms, their regeneration potentials, management and propagation status, as well as usage and land-use constraints. Results showed drought- tolerant species (Parkia biglobosa and Mangifera indica) topped the dominant trees list across the three AEZ, both having 50% more than other agroforestry trees. Though farmers’ management strategies were highly relevant to regeneration and productivity, they did not differ across the zones (P<0.05) except at cropping outside tree canopy cover between SGS and SS using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Positive associations (0.5-0.8) between functions and preference for trees on farms for dominant agroforestry species. Farmers’ adaptation strategy to minimise risk to climate drivers and increase dry forests landscapes resilience made the driest AEZ (SS) had most species on farms and positively impacted the locals' livelihoods. Keywords: Trees, Drought, Farmers, Regeneration, Parklands ID: 3486501
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    Modelling the growing space of parkia biglobosa benth for agroforestry project
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Parkia biglobosa is a leguminous tree that plays a significant role in the socio-economic wellbeing of people especially in rural communities of sub-Saharan Africa. The trees are maintained on farms by farmers because of the benefits derived from them. Its inclusion in agroforestry practice is often limited due to inadequate information on appropriate growing space or planting distance. Agroforestry practice often requires the determination of planting distance in the form of alleys to reduce the effect of canopy cover. Therefore, in this study, the growing space requirement of P. biglobosa for agroforestry project was determined. The dataset used consists of 288 trees measured from the P. Biglobosa plantation in Markurdi, Nigeria. Quantile egression technique was used to establish a simple relationship between tree crown width (Cw) and diameter at breast height (dbh) of the species. This relationship was used to estimate the growing space required for the establishment of agroforestry project. The limiting density and stand basal area were also estimated. The result shows that the relationship of the form: Cw = 2.674 + 0.095dbh, explained 56.2% of the variation in crown width with a mean bias of 0.985. Also, the study shows e.g., that P. biglobosa trees of 10 cm dbh would each require 3.2 m of growing space with limiting density and basal area of about 982 trees/ha and 6.06 m2 /ha, respectively. Furthermore, trees of 50 cm dbh would each require 6.6 m of growing space with a limiting density and basal area of about 232 trees/ha and 35.86 m2 /ha, respectively. In agroforestry practice, alleys are predetermined from the onset of the project, and as such, information from this study could be used to determine the planting distance and the limiting density of the species. Thus, arable crops can be integrated between the alleys. Keywords: Crown width; quantile regression; limiting density; stand basal area; Parkia biglobosa ID: 3474105
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    Linking conservation of forest genetic resources to species restoration in Western Himalayas
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Himalayas are rich repositories of biodiversity and provide ecosystem goods and services to the communities of the area. Many ecologically and socio-economically important species of the Himalayan region are threatened due to their utilization, deforestation, degradation and climate change. These threaten the sustainability of forest genetic resources and highlight the importance of conservation and sustainable management of these resources. A research program on conservation of Forest Genetic Resources (FGRs) with special focus on the exploration of FGRs of North-West Himalayas has been undertaken with the support from Environment and Forest Ministry of India. Under the programme major activities undertaken are documentation of species populations, their characterization and germplasm storage. The population of the prioritized species are being explored, populations geo-tagged, phenological observations and species associations recorded. Their seeds are collected at maturity, processed, tested for quality and desiccated to safe moisture levels for storage. The seed storage physiology of important Himalayan species like spruce, fir, Acer spp., oaks, Carpinus, Buxus, Fraxinus, pines, rhododendrons, walnut, Corylus, Hippophae, medicinal shrubs/trees, etc. are being studied for chalking out a long-term ex situ conservation programme. Seeds of most of these species have orthodox seeds which after slow desiccation to lowest safe moisture levels are vacuum sealed and stored in seed bank at -180C for periodic regeneration. Thus, ex situ conservation becomes the focal point of gene conservation programme of FGRs of Himalayan Region. Conservation units of species, in nature, that maintain vital genetic diversity for the species survival and adaptive capacity for their sustenance are important. Utilizing the knowledge and information from long-term FGR conservation programmes for chalking out robust species restoration strategies, will only script the success stories. Keywords: Conservation, Forest Genetic Resources, Seeds,field germplasm bank, species restoration ID: 3486837

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