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Farmers' Rights in the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture









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    Options for encouraging, guiding and promoting the realization of Farmers’ Rights as set out in Article 9 of the International Treaty 2023
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    Farmers feed the world, by producing the food on which we all depend. Since farmers are the developers and custodians of crop diversity in the field, their rights in this regard are critical to maintain their pivotal role in providing food security and nutrition – never more so than in the current era of climate change and other major challenges facing humanity. The International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources (International Treaty) is the first legally binding international agreement to formally recognize the contribution of local and Indigenous communities and farmers to the conservation and development of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture. Article 9 of the International Treaty provides for the recognition, realization and promotion of Farmers’ Rights as they relate to plant genetic resources for food and agriculture. Farmers’ Rights can be realized through a series of measures and practices that can be put in place to protect, promote and realize these rights. The promotion and realization of these rights enable farmers and farming communities to continue performing their role as developers and custodians of crop diversity, and to feed the world for the generations to come. This publication presents the “Options for encouraging, guiding, and promoting the realization of Farmers' Rights, as set out in Article 9 of the International Treaty". It contains 27 options developed by an expert group, drawing on the experiences of Contracting Parties and stakeholders. Contracting Parties and interested stakeholders are invited to consider the full range of options for implementing Farmers' Rights at the national level, in accordance with their needs and priorities and as appropriate.
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    Farmers' Rights - Educational Module V 2021
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    The role of farmers as custodians and innovators of plant genetic diversity that feeds the world population was not formally recognized at the international level until the adoption of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. The International Treaty is the first legally binding instrument that recognizes the enormous contribution of local and indigenous communities and farmers worldwide to the development and conservation of crop diversity. This module examines its origins and provisions in the International Treaty and presents some practical activities for the realization of Farmers’ Rights. It aims to (i) understand the crucial role of farmers in the conservation and sustainable use of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture; (ii) describe the evolution of Farmers’ Rights up to their recognition by the International Treaty; (iii) explain the components of Article 9 of the International Treaty; (iv) illustrate the implementation of Article 9 at the national level with practical examples and best practices; and (v) strengthen stakeholders’ capacities for implementing Farmers’ Rights as reflected in Article 9 of the International Treaty. The realization of Farmers’ Rights falls under the responsibility of national governments, and the adoption of measures for the promotion of Farmers’ Rights, therefore, remains at the discretion of national authorities. Although there is no binding agreement for the implementation of Farmers’ Rights, it is clear that farmers need to be supported to continue their role as stewards of plant genetic diversity in agriculture.
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    Biocultural Community Protocols for Livestock Keepers 2010
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    Biocultural Community Protocols are a new approach that provides livestock-keeping communities the opportunity of documenting and showcasing their role in the management of animal genetic resources and agro-ecosystems. They offer insights into the all-important socio-cultural dimensions of livestock diversity that have remained invisible during standard livestock research on animal genetic resources. They provide an opportunity for communities to tell the story from their perspective and bring t o light issues that researchers and development workers have not paid attention to so far. They describe the ritual and ceremonial meaning of livestock, they document traditional resource management and drought adaptation strategies, they identify the factors that may have led to the decline of a breed, and they make specific requests to outsiders for recognition of their role as custodians of biological diversity. Establishment of a biocultural community protocol involves a facilitated process in which a community or group of livestock keepers reflects about the meaning of their breeds, their own role in maintaining it and their vision and concerns for and about the future. The reflections are put on paper, and the community is informed about existing national rules and international legal frameworks that support its role in biodiversity conservation. Although the number of biocultural community protocols that has been established by livestock keepers is still limited, they have alrea dy validated the concept and there is an enormous interest among other communities in developing their protocols. Biocultural community protocols contribute to the implementation of several international frameworks. The most important of these are the UN Convention on Biological Diversity and the Global Plan of Action for Animal Genetic Resources. They also correspond to and implement the provisions of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People as well as the Voluntary Guidelines to S upport the Progressive Realization of the Right to Adequate Food in the Context of National Food Security. Furthermore, they may provide an answer to the increasingly debated question of how to protect the rights of small-scale livestock keepers in a global scenario in which Intellectual Property Rights become ever more prevalent in animal breeding. At community level, the development of biocultural community protocols strengthens interest in the conservation of indigenous livestock breeds and i nitiates a discussion about how to deal with factors undermining conservation

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