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Summary of the tripartite meeting to accelerate prevention and control of neglected foodborne parasitic zoonoses in selected Asian countries

16 – 18 October 2018, Luang Prabang, Lao People's Democratic Republic








​FAO. 2019.Summary of the tripartite meeting to accelerate prevention and control of neglected foodborne parasitic zoonoses in selected Asian countries. Bangkok.


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    Meeting to Accelerate Prevention and Control of Neglected Foodborne Parasitic Zoonoses in Selected Asian Countries 2020
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    The Meeting to Accelerate Prevention and Control of Neglected Foodborne Parasitic Zoonoses in Selected Asian Countries was jointly organized by FAO Regional Office of Asia and the Pacific (FAO RAP), OIE Regional Representation for Asia and the Pacific (OIE RRAP), WHO Southeast Asia Regional Office (SEARO) and Western Pacific Regional Office (WPRO), in Luang Prabang, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, on 16-18 October 2018. The objectives of the meeting were: o to review the progress of prevention and control of neglected foodborne parasitic zoonoses in Asia; o to share experience, issues, challenges and opportunities to leverage existing platforms and frameworks and strengthen intersectoral collaboration and partnership for accelerating prevention and control of neglected foodborne parasitic zoonoses; and o to agree on multisectoral action priorities to address identified issues and challenges and accelerate prevention and control of neglected foodborne parasitic zoonoses in Asia.
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    Booklet
    A key role for veterinary authorities and animal health practitioners in preventing and controlling neglected parasitic zoonoses
    A handbook with focus on Taenia solium, Trichinella, Echinococcus and Fasciola
    2021
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    Neglected parasitic zoonoses, such as cysticercosis and echinococcosis, are a group of zoonoses that continue to impose a significant burden and affect livelihoods of the vulnerable populations that typically have limited access to adequate sanitation, basic living conditions, health and veterinary services and awareness. Recognising the disease burden and importance of a multisectoral approach to controlling and eliminating neglected parasitic zoonoses, in 2018 the Regional Tripartite jointly organised a regional workshop on neglected foodborne parasitic zoonoses. To control zoonoses in an efficient, effective and sustainable way, it is important to understand the transmission cycle of each disease and to implement strategic interventions at key stages via multisectoral participation from public health, animal health, environmental health and food safety. Prevention and control of infection in animals is one of the critical means to reduce the burden of zoonoses in humans, therefore the animal health sector has a very important role to play. However, awareness and knowledge are often limited among veterinary authorities, public health practitioners, animal health practitioners and animal owners. This handbook focuses on interventions that the animal health sector can implement to prevent human and animal disease caused by these parasites. It aims to provide up-to-date information in a concise form and is expected to encourage the relevant stakeholders to take actions to control and prevent neglected parasitic zoonoses. Although the handbook was written primarily for Asia and the Pacific region, the information is relevant in many other regions. We hope you find this handbook useful and practical.
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    Booklet
    Parasites in foods: An invisible threat
    Food safety technical toolkit for Asia and the Pacific
    2020
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    Foodborne parasitic diseases are often neglected in various food safety control systems, even though they can create severe human health problems. Because the production and monetary losses associated with them are often not visible, and the infected animals often show no signs, they are very difficult to detect. Different types of parasitic diseases can be transmitted to humans from pork, fish, freshwater crustaceans, vegetables, eggs of tapeworms, and protozoa. The risks associated with all of them can, however, be avoided through the application of good hygiene, good farming and fishing practices, and the promotion of community awareness. For example, the promotion of a participatory approach and the development of training packages for food business operators would be beneficial in raising awareness within the community. Basic information regarding how the parasites are transmitted and their effects, and any and all preventive measures that each person can take, should be included in communication topics. Food safety authorities can play an important part by using the guidance provided by Codex Alimentarius regarding animal production, food processing, and meat inspection. Furthermore, the development of networks of authorities committed to addressing the problem would help prevent and control the spread of parasitic diseases.

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