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Promoting fruit and vegetable value chains to improve supply and consumption










FAO and Ministry of Social Development and Family of Chile. 2021. Promoting fruit and vegetable value chains to improve supply and consumption. Santiago de Chile. 




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    Book (stand-alone)
    Promoting sustainable and inclusive value chains for fruits and vegetables - Policy review
    Background paper for the FAO/WHO International Workshop on Fruits and Vegetables 2020
    2021
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    The persistence of undernutrition and the increasing levels of overweight and obesity worldwide (with their associated societal costs) are calling for a transformation of food systems towards healthier diets. Fruits and vegetables are key components of a healthy diet; however, their consumption is considerably below the minimal levels recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). This underconsumption is particularly pronounced in low- and middle-income countries and among low-income socio-economic groups in all countries. This paper uses the value chain approach to analyze the factors that affect the availability and affordability of fruits and vegetables. It examines major challenges across the value chain and identifies opportunities for improvement as seen through a nutrition-sensitive lens. Factors that negatively affect the availability and affordability of fruits and vegetables discussed in this paper include low production and productivity, the loss of agrobiodiversity, inadequate technology, logistics and infrastructure, weak organizational, business, and technical skills, and inefficient market linkages across the supply chain. The paper proposes a number of policy recommendations based on insights from documented cases of good practices and on lessons learned in domestic and export-oriented value chains. The paper makes a case for reviving native, underutilized, and neglected fruit and vegetable varieties to improve nutrition and increase agrobiodiversity. In addition, short value chains delivering to local markets are recommended as a resilience strategy for smallscale producers and low-income consumers in the face of climatic and economic shocks.
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    Policy brief
    Reducing food loss and valorizing fruits and residues to boost avocado industry sustainability and profitability 2024
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    Avocados, like other tropical fruits, are susceptible to food loss and waste due to their high moisture content and perishable nature. Factors including climate change, inadequate infrastructure and handling during harvesting, packaging and transportation increase the risk of food loss, impacting fruit supply and quality. Embracing strategies to reduce losses and maximize the use of non-marketable and damaged avocado fruit and residues is a win-win for businesses and global sustainability objectives including food security and climate action. By reducing losses, producers and businesses can also increase their competitiveness and resilience and enhance their reputation with markets and customers. This technical brief presents practical ideas on how stakeholders operating in avocado value chains can minimize food loss and valorize residues. The Sustainable Tropical Fruits series highlights important developments, technical information and good practices related to resilient, sustainable and inclusive tropical fruit value chains. For more information or to suggest future topics, please contact Responsible-Fruits@fao.org.
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    Policy brief
    Reducing food loss and valorizing fruits and residues to boost pineapple industry sustainability and profitability 2024
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    Pineapples, like other tropical fruits, are susceptible to food loss and waste due to their high moisture content and perishable nature. Factors including climate change, inadequate infrastructure, and handling during harvesting, packaging and transportation increase the risk of food loss, impacting fruit supply and quality. Embracing strategies to reduce losses and maximize the use of non-marketable and damaged pineapple fruit and residues is a win-win for businesses and global sustainability objectives including food security and climate action. By reducing losses, producers and businesses can also increase their competitiveness and resilience and enhance their reputation with markets and customers. This technical brief presents practical ideas on how stakeholders operating in pineapple value chains can minimize food loss and valorize residues. The Sustainable Tropical Fruits series highlights important developments, technical information and good practices related to resilient, sustainable and inclusive tropical fruit value chains. For more information or to suggest future topics, please contact Responsible-Fruits@fao.org.

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