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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Improving the way we work 2013
    The Strategic Thinking Process launched in January 2012 helped sharpen the focus of FAO's work and recognized the need for major changes in the way we do business. First,we needed to adopt a results-oriented approach whereby we identify what has to happen and then figure out how to get it done. Second, we needed to make sure that the impact of our work would be felt on the ground and that it would be backed by the global and national policies and practices required to make that impact sustaina ble. Above all, we recognized that our activities must more clearly focus on results, on efficiency and on work in the field.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Ten ways to make fresh markets food safe
    Special edition No. 1
    2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Healthy food provides us the nutrients and energy to develop and grow, be active and healthy, to move, play, work, think and learn. But food, if not treated with care and respect, can also make us ill. Bacteria, viruses and parasites found in food can cause food poisoning. This is why food safety and hygiene are important. Each year, many Bangladeshis fall ill because of food poisoning. Fresh markets are very popular in Bangladesh, providing a range of essential produce at affordable prices, including fruit and vegetables, seafood, and meat. But poor hygiene practices can cause problems. What can be done to improve this? Fresh markets are an important place to start. A survey by FAO in 2018 shows that over 85 percent of households in Dhaka buy their food from fresh markets, and while the pandemic has impacted their popularity due to safety fears, they retain their appeal. This report shares ten priority measures that will make fresh markets safer places to go shopping and purchase food. They focus on practical and easy-to-implement practices, such as wearing masks, hand washing, and performing regular cleaning and safety checks. The below report shares the key actions to take place, as well as the problems that such actions helps to overcome. Implementing such food safety and hygiene practices makes fresh markets attractive; they transform them from sources of contamination and infection to pleasant public spaces and sources of food security and nutrition. In addition safe and clean markets increase incomes for vendors and brings better health to consumers. 1. Separate vegetable, fish, meat, and grocery stalls to prevent cross contamination 2. Prevent COVID spread by reducing over-crowding and implementing proper mask use 3. Provide filtered, clean water so vegetables, fish, poultry and meat can be well cleaned 4. Require hand washing at the entry of the fresh market and in the meat and fish areas 5. Improve waste management and pest control to ensure market hygiene 6. Ensure that areas where slaughter takes place are completely separated from sales areas 7. Raise awareness for the need for pre-slaughter health examination, post-slaughter inspection, and basic food safety practice in meat shops 8. Make sure drains are clean, covered, sloped, and well maintained 9. Require cold storage for perishable items 10. Develop regular monitoring systems
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Promoting agricultural inputs under the Food Aid Convention to increase food production in emergency-prone developing countries 2010
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Assistance needs for the rapidly increasing emergency situations require more judicious responses on the part of donors, including the provision of critical agricultural inputs such as seeds, fertilizers and farming implements for reconstruction and recovery of the agriculture sector. The institutional framework governing food-related assistance has been at an impasse for some time, with the renegotiation of the Food Aid Convention (FAC) remaining in suspense, awaiting the conclusion of the un certain Doha Round of negotiations, although there have been fresh efforts to move the FAC process forward. The Food and Agriculture organization of the United Nations is the key agency within the multilateral system responsible for coordinating donor efforts in the rehabilitation of agriculture in the aftermath of emergencies. The Organization has a keen interest in seeing that the FAC process is concluded soon, taking on board the new realities on the ground, in particular assisting affect ed communities to resume agricultural activity and return to self-reliance. An analysis of trends in natural and human-induced disasters over the last 30 years confirms the large increase in protracted emergency situations, whereby several countries experience a food emergency year after year. In addition, many of these countries suffer serious chronic food insecurity and these two problems (the transitory and the structural) cannot be addressed separately. A stop-gap approach based on sho rt-term food assistance is not sustainable in these situations. Interventions should also aim to break the cycle of long-term structural problems feeding into greater vulnerability in the short term. Increasing donor support in the form of agricultural inputs, together with meeting immediate food needs, is critical in expediting recovery and helping agricultural communities getting back on their feet. Meeting immediate food emergency needs has become the main priority of donors with nearly 80 percent of total food aid now used for that purpose compared with well below 20 percent up to 1990. At the same time donors’ funding arrangements have become more flexible with a large majority of donors providing cash resources to facilitate local purchases and triangular transactions, as well as funds for the purchase of agricultural inputs. While support for the agriculture sector within the United Nations Consolidated Appeals Process has increased in recent years, agriculture remains he avily underfunded in relation to identified needs and other sectors, with only 41 percent of the sector’s needs being met in recent years. Overall, FAO’s efforts in rehabilitation and recovery of the agriculture sector have been compromised by a lack of adequate funding. An analysis of a multitude of arrangements governing food-related assistance (the Consultative Sub-Committee on Surplus Disposal [CSSD], World Trade Organization [WTO] and FAC) shows that although they are guided by the legiti mate objective of food aid doing more good and less harm, often for a variety of reasons they are not conducive to a coherent framework and may compromise the effectiveness of this assistance. Among them, the FAC is much broader than the CSSD and the WTO, both as regards its food security objective and the specific provisions contained therein. Recognizing the importance of the FAC and expediting its negotiation to better meet its objectives has been the focus of attention by the internationa l community for some time and recent intensified 6 efforts by the Food Aid Committee aim at launching formal negotiations. This would also respond to recent policy initiatives and strategies of donors whereby humanitarian food assistance is increasingly seen as an integral part of efforts to address the structural causes of chronic food insecurity. The FAC is no longer seen as simply having an ‘instrument focus’ (i.e. food aid) but also a ‘problem focus’ (i.e. food security), becoming a part of the broader processes of needs assessment and the related longer-term developmental responses. This paper aims at making a contribution in the process of renegotiating the FAC, in particular as regards the recognition of the importance of agricultural inputs for the recovery and rehabilitation of the agriculture sector.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Improving the way we work 2013
    The Strategic Thinking Process launched in January 2012 helped sharpen the focus of FAO's work and recognized the need for major changes in the way we do business. First,we needed to adopt a results-oriented approach whereby we identify what has to happen and then figure out how to get it done. Second, we needed to make sure that the impact of our work would be felt on the ground and that it would be backed by the global and national policies and practices required to make that impact sustaina ble. Above all, we recognized that our activities must more clearly focus on results, on efficiency and on work in the field.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Ten ways to make fresh markets food safe
    Special edition No. 1
    2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Healthy food provides us the nutrients and energy to develop and grow, be active and healthy, to move, play, work, think and learn. But food, if not treated with care and respect, can also make us ill. Bacteria, viruses and parasites found in food can cause food poisoning. This is why food safety and hygiene are important. Each year, many Bangladeshis fall ill because of food poisoning. Fresh markets are very popular in Bangladesh, providing a range of essential produce at affordable prices, including fruit and vegetables, seafood, and meat. But poor hygiene practices can cause problems. What can be done to improve this? Fresh markets are an important place to start. A survey by FAO in 2018 shows that over 85 percent of households in Dhaka buy their food from fresh markets, and while the pandemic has impacted their popularity due to safety fears, they retain their appeal. This report shares ten priority measures that will make fresh markets safer places to go shopping and purchase food. They focus on practical and easy-to-implement practices, such as wearing masks, hand washing, and performing regular cleaning and safety checks. The below report shares the key actions to take place, as well as the problems that such actions helps to overcome. Implementing such food safety and hygiene practices makes fresh markets attractive; they transform them from sources of contamination and infection to pleasant public spaces and sources of food security and nutrition. In addition safe and clean markets increase incomes for vendors and brings better health to consumers. 1. Separate vegetable, fish, meat, and grocery stalls to prevent cross contamination 2. Prevent COVID spread by reducing over-crowding and implementing proper mask use 3. Provide filtered, clean water so vegetables, fish, poultry and meat can be well cleaned 4. Require hand washing at the entry of the fresh market and in the meat and fish areas 5. Improve waste management and pest control to ensure market hygiene 6. Ensure that areas where slaughter takes place are completely separated from sales areas 7. Raise awareness for the need for pre-slaughter health examination, post-slaughter inspection, and basic food safety practice in meat shops 8. Make sure drains are clean, covered, sloped, and well maintained 9. Require cold storage for perishable items 10. Develop regular monitoring systems
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Promoting agricultural inputs under the Food Aid Convention to increase food production in emergency-prone developing countries 2010
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Assistance needs for the rapidly increasing emergency situations require more judicious responses on the part of donors, including the provision of critical agricultural inputs such as seeds, fertilizers and farming implements for reconstruction and recovery of the agriculture sector. The institutional framework governing food-related assistance has been at an impasse for some time, with the renegotiation of the Food Aid Convention (FAC) remaining in suspense, awaiting the conclusion of the un certain Doha Round of negotiations, although there have been fresh efforts to move the FAC process forward. The Food and Agriculture organization of the United Nations is the key agency within the multilateral system responsible for coordinating donor efforts in the rehabilitation of agriculture in the aftermath of emergencies. The Organization has a keen interest in seeing that the FAC process is concluded soon, taking on board the new realities on the ground, in particular assisting affect ed communities to resume agricultural activity and return to self-reliance. An analysis of trends in natural and human-induced disasters over the last 30 years confirms the large increase in protracted emergency situations, whereby several countries experience a food emergency year after year. In addition, many of these countries suffer serious chronic food insecurity and these two problems (the transitory and the structural) cannot be addressed separately. A stop-gap approach based on sho rt-term food assistance is not sustainable in these situations. Interventions should also aim to break the cycle of long-term structural problems feeding into greater vulnerability in the short term. Increasing donor support in the form of agricultural inputs, together with meeting immediate food needs, is critical in expediting recovery and helping agricultural communities getting back on their feet. Meeting immediate food emergency needs has become the main priority of donors with nearly 80 percent of total food aid now used for that purpose compared with well below 20 percent up to 1990. At the same time donors’ funding arrangements have become more flexible with a large majority of donors providing cash resources to facilitate local purchases and triangular transactions, as well as funds for the purchase of agricultural inputs. While support for the agriculture sector within the United Nations Consolidated Appeals Process has increased in recent years, agriculture remains he avily underfunded in relation to identified needs and other sectors, with only 41 percent of the sector’s needs being met in recent years. Overall, FAO’s efforts in rehabilitation and recovery of the agriculture sector have been compromised by a lack of adequate funding. An analysis of a multitude of arrangements governing food-related assistance (the Consultative Sub-Committee on Surplus Disposal [CSSD], World Trade Organization [WTO] and FAC) shows that although they are guided by the legiti mate objective of food aid doing more good and less harm, often for a variety of reasons they are not conducive to a coherent framework and may compromise the effectiveness of this assistance. Among them, the FAC is much broader than the CSSD and the WTO, both as regards its food security objective and the specific provisions contained therein. Recognizing the importance of the FAC and expediting its negotiation to better meet its objectives has been the focus of attention by the internationa l community for some time and recent intensified 6 efforts by the Food Aid Committee aim at launching formal negotiations. This would also respond to recent policy initiatives and strategies of donors whereby humanitarian food assistance is increasingly seen as an integral part of efforts to address the structural causes of chronic food insecurity. The FAC is no longer seen as simply having an ‘instrument focus’ (i.e. food aid) but also a ‘problem focus’ (i.e. food security), becoming a part of the broader processes of needs assessment and the related longer-term developmental responses. This paper aims at making a contribution in the process of renegotiating the FAC, in particular as regards the recognition of the importance of agricultural inputs for the recovery and rehabilitation of the agriculture sector.

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