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State of the art report on quinoa around the world in 2013










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    Book (stand-alone)
    International Cookbook for Quinoa: Tradition and innovation
    Quinoa a future sown thousands of years ago
    2014
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    Quinoa, the so-called golden grain, was safeguarded for thousands of years by the inhabitants of the Andean regions of Latin America and has only recently been discovered by the world. In its honour, the United Nations declared 2013 as the International Year of Quinoa. In doing so, the UN paid tribute to the Andean indigenous peoples who have maintained, controlled, protected and preserved quinoa as a food for present and future generations thanks to their knowledge and traditional w ay of life in harmony with nature. But not only this; the United Nations General Assembly also noted the nutritional characteristics of quinoa and its adaptability to different agroecological conditions, properties that, coupled with its low cost of production, make it a strong partner in the fight against hunger and food insecurity The origin of this cookbook stems from that recognition by the United Nations. Its purpose is to serve as a means of publicizing quinoa and its benefit s beyond its area of origin, to promote its production and consumption throughout the world and thus to reach those countries that suffer most from food insecurity. With this in mind, FAO resorted to tradition and innovation. Tradition takes the form of everyday recipes of peoples and communities living in the quinoa producing regions of Latin America. The dishes have varied origins, some going back many centuries, others only existing for a few generations. As for innovation, FAO us ed the Chefs Against Hunger campaign to contact dozens of chefs around the world and to invite them to present recipes that were inexpensive, healthy, nutritious, and simple to prepare and whose preparation was based on ingredients from their local region. Not an easy challenge. The outcome was 37 recipes with ingredients from all over the world, exotic flavours and varied textures and aromas. Evidence of the versatility of this grain, which can adapt to all cuisines. This publicatio n combines both types of recipe, traditional and innovative, to offer more than 60 different dishes. We hope that you will enjoy this cookbook, that you will venture into the wide selection of quinoa flavours and, if you are able, that you will share it with those who can most benefit from it, thereby helping to disseminate this future sown thousands of years ago.
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    Prospects for quinoa adaptation and utilization in Eastern and Southern Africa
    Technological, institutional and policy considerations
    2020
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    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.), is an emerging crop in the world with great potential to contribute to Africa’s food and nutritional security. The increased popularity of quinoa in the last few years is attributed to the impact of activities carried out within the framework of the International Year of Quinoa (IYQ2013) which helped greatly to raise awareness on the crop’s multiple nutritional benefits and its expanding cultivation globally. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), which championed the IYQ2013 has worked with developing countries in Africa, which are grappling with food and nutrition insecurity, to introduce and promote cultivation of quinoa. Production and utilization of quinoa is expected to significantly reduce food and nutrition insecurity and help farming communities adapt to climate change. FAO implemented a Technical Cooperation on quinoa titled “Technical Assistance for the Strengthening of the Food System of Quinoa” (TCP/SFE/3406) implemented in 2014 to 2015. This project was designed to support the institutional capacities of seven countries including Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda, and Zambia, in the production, evaluation, management, utilization, and marketing of Quinoa under diverse farming systems and agro-ecological zones. The project was implemented and led by the FAO Subregional office for Eastern Africa (SFE). Quinoa evaluation trials that were conducted across multiple sites in the participating countries served as pilot adaptability studies for the crop. This technical paper presents key technological, institutional and policy consideration for the successful introduction, adaptation and utilization of quinoa in Africa.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Quinoa in the Kitchen 2013
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    Slow Food and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have a shared vision of a sustainable world free from hunger and that safeguards biodiversity for future generations. The collaboration between FAO and Slow Food originates from our common goals and our mutual interest to promote the wealth of local gastronomic traditions in defence of food biodiversity and in support of smallholder farmers and producers. Our common goals are reflected today in a number of shared initiatives. This book - published during 2013, the International Year of Quinoa - has the objective of promoting knowledge about quinoa and its use as an important step contributing towards freedom from hunger and malnutrition. Central to the process is gastronomy itself and the idea that this holistic, multidisciplinary science, which encompasses everything from agriculture to history, from economics to anthropology, from botany to culinary art, can be a liberating f orce for the communities most hit by malnutrition. Ancestral traditions and the protection of biodiversity through work in the fields and use in the kitchen, as in the case of quinoa, can contribute to liberating many people in the world from conditions of food insecurity. From this point of view, Latin America, where quinoa originated and grows best, is proving an interesting testing ground. Today, a new generation of high-profile chefs are rediscovering the forgotten food produ cts of local rural communities and bringing them to the attention of world gastronomy critics. Quinoa is just one of the food products leading this new wave, and maybe the most important: a symbol of a renaissance that is building a gastronomic identity for the peoples of Latin America, a way for them to stand up for themselves. All we have to do is support this movement and demonstrate through knowledge of food products and the stories behind them that, in every local area hit by hunger and malnutrition, it is possible to find solutions to some of the key problems they face. The starting points are in each areas’ unique biodiversity and ancient agricultural and gastronomic traditions. Slow Food and FAO are proud to materialize their collaboration with the creation of this book on quinoa. It provides the reader with a deep understanding of this unique and special food, from the crop's ancient origins to its nutritional properties. The book is also enriched with recipes from renowned international chefs who place particular emphasis on the ease of preparing quinoa and the use of local ingredients.

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