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    Article
    Forestry education in Nigeria: Are forestry students unwilling to study the course and does it influence their academic performance?
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Forestry education in Nigeria, as it is globally, is faced with several drawbacks despite the urgent need to train more professionals who can tackle the increasing issues related to forestry. One of these concerns is the reducing interest in academic forestry programs evident by low enrolment rates. However, forestry education still pools relatively good enrolment across Nigerian tertiary institutions, often due to candidates’ inability to secure their initially desired courses. Meanwhile, this could have influenced their academic achievements and career progressions. This study, therefore, analysed the unwillingness of forestry students in Nigeria to study the course and its impact on their academic performance, taking the department of Forestry at FUTA as a case study. A survey was used to collect data from the students (193) on four study levels, comprising their demographics, unwillingness to study forestry, interest to further in forestry-related works and studies, and their academic performance. Descriptive and Chi-square statistics were then used to analyse the responses. The results show that majority of the students were male (56%), mainly within the ages 20-25 (60%) and had been admitted via the Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (63%) with no prior forestry awareness, unlike the direct-entry students who mostly had post-secondary forestry-related experience. Widely, students’ perception evidenced their unwillingness towards the discipline with about 68%, 65%, and 94% of them not having prior knowledge about forestry before admission, never chose the course, and would not wish to further in any related post-study engagements, respectively. Meanwhile, only their educational background and their parents' educational level were found to have influenced their unwillingness. It was also revealed that this unwillingness impacted their academic performance significantly. Therefore, Forestry education should be made more attractive in every way possible to facilitate students’ interest and consequently improve academic performance and professional competence in forestry sector. Keywords: Forestry education, unwillingness, interest, influence and academic performance ID: 3623841
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    Farm Business School handbook: Training of facilitators programme for South Asia 2011
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    Dramatic changes are taking place in farming worldwide as a result of globalisation, liberalisation, and rapid urbanisation. Farmers are intensifying existing patterns of production and diversifying their farm enterprises in an attempt to improve their livelihoods. Technical know-how is not enough. In order to be competitive and take advantage of the new opportunities that are arising, farmers increasingly have to adapt their farm business to market changes and improve efficiency, profitability and income. Farmers' skills and capacity can only be built through a process of learning and practice. The Farm Business School (FBS) has been developed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to help farmers learn how to make their farming enterprises and overall farm operations profitable and able to respond to market demands. The learning takes place at the village level and farmers' capacity in entrepreneurial and management skills is built via a "learning by doing" ap proach. Extension officers and lead farmers are trained as facilitators and then organise seasonal training courses, where farmers work in small groups at their own pace using materials that have been specially designed for the schools. The Training of Facilitators Programme consists of two parts: 1) a facilitators manual and 2) a handbook for the participants. This publication presents the handbook.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Farm Business School manual: Training of farmers programme for South Asia 2011
    Also available in:
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    Dramatic changes are taking place in farming worldwide as a result of globalisation, liberalisation, and rapid urbanisation. Farmers are intensifying existing patterns of production and diversifying their farm enterprises in an attempt to improve their livelihoods. Technical know-how is not enough. In order to be competitive and take advantage of the new opportunities that are arising, farmers increasingly have to adapt their farm business to market changes and improve efficiency, profitability and income. Farmers' skills and capacity can only be built through a process of learning and practice. The Farm Business School (FBS) has been developed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to help farmers learn how to make their farming enterprises and overall farm operations profitable and able to respond to market demands. The learning takes place at the village level and farmers' capacity in entrepreneurial and management skills is built via a "learning by doing" ap proach. Extension officers and lead farmers are trained as facilitators and then organise seasonal training courses, where farmers work in small groups at their own pace using materials that have been specially designed for the schools. The Training of Farmers Programme consists of two parts: 1) the manual which provides the facilitator with step-by-step guidelines to the Farmer Training Programme and 2) the handbook which is a reference book for farmers to use during and after the FBS meetings and outlines key concepts as well as experimental exercises to help facilitate farmers' learning. This publication presents the manual.

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