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Criteria and Indicators framework to measure the sustainability of forest resources in India and their contribution to SDGs and GFGs

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Post-2015 Agenda and Sustainable Development Goals: Where Are We Now? Global Opportunities to Address Malnutrition in all Its Forms, Including Hidden Hunger 2018
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    Combatting malnutrition in all its forms - undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies, overweight, and obesity - is one of the greatest challenges that countries are facing. Much has happened in less than 10 years to redefine the international nutrition landscape and place nutrition at the heart of global development efforts. The food crises of 2008 and the Lancet first series on maternal and child undernutrition helped galvanize world attention. The enormous health and economic consequences of malnutrition were recognized, and far more attention began to be paid to the multiple burdens of malnutrition. In 2014, the Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2) endorsed 2 outcome documents, committing world leaders to establishing national policies aimed at eliminating malnutrition in all its forms, including hidden hunger, and transforming food systems to make nutritious diets available to all. In 2015, 193 Member States of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), global objectives to guide the actions of the international community over the next 15 years (2016-2030). Member States placed high priority on addressing malnutrition in all its forms by committing, under SDG 2, to “end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture.” However, nutrition has also a role to play in achieving other goals of the 2030 Agenda, including goals related to poverty, health, education, social protection, gender, water, work, growth, inequality, and climate change. In 2016, the United Nations General Assembly endorsed the ICN2 outcome documents and proclaimed the years 2016-2025 as the United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition. The Nutrition Decade reaffirmed the commitments under the ICN2 and the 2030 Agenda to end malnutrition in all its forms. Together, the ICN2, the 2030 Agenda, and the Nutrition Decade have placed nutrition firmly at the heart of the development agenda with the recognition that transformed food systems have a fundamental role to play in promoting healthy diets and improving nutrition. This paper reviews the major international nutrition system changes called for, and provides an analysis of recent governance initiatives to address malnutrition in all its forms, including hidden hunger problems. See also https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/484334
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    Phuket Consensus: a re-affirmation of commitment to the Bangkok Declaration - Global Conference on Aquaculture 2010 2010
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    The Kyoto Strategy for Aquaculture Development adopted in 1976 facilitated the transformation of aquaculture from a traditional to a science-based economic activity. It promoted technical cooperation among developing countries to expand aquaculture development. The UNEP Convention on Biological Diversity that came into effect in 1993 reflected the world community's commitment to manage biodiversity for the welfare of present and future generations The FAO Code of Conduct for Respon sible Fisheries promulgated in 1995 enshrined the principles of sustainability and responsibility in the practice of fisheries, aquaculture and trade in aquatic products. The Bangkok Declaration and Strategy adopted in 2000 articulated 17 strategic elements for aquaculture development. These could be broadly summarised as: (i) a responsible farmer is justifiably rewarded; (ii) costs and benefits are shared equitably; (iii) society benefits from the practice and products of aquacultur e; (iv) adequate, affordable and safe food is available and accessible to everyone; (v) the environment is conserved for the next generation, and (vi) the development of the sector is orderly. At the threshold of this millennium, in September 2000 in New York, the global community adopted the United Nations Millennium Declaration which set the eight Millennium Development Goals. The Paris Declaration adopted in March 2005, provides the guidelines for the correct targeting, effectiv e coordination and efficient management and utilization of external assistance. Gl o b a l C o n f e r e n c e o n Aq u a c u l t u r e 2 0 1 0 F a rmi n g t h e Wa t e r s fo r P e o p l e a n d F o o d 22-25 Sept ember 20 10 – Phuket , Thai l and 2 In the third World Food Summit on food security held in November 2009 in Rome, the leaders of nations pledged their renewed commitment to eradicate hunger at the earliest possible date. Towards the end of the first decade in Decemb er 2009, the world agreed, in Copenhagen, to meet with resolve and a common purpose the challenges of climate change. These global accords, with the Bangkok Declaration and Strategy as the core instrument for aquaculture development, shall continue to guide the development and management of aquaculture beyond 2010 through the first quarter of this century.
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    Strengthening the Capacity of Pacific Island Countries to Monitor SDG Target 2.1 - TCP/SAP/3705 2022
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    The 2030 Agenda was adopted in September 2015 by the United Nations General Assembly, as a universal call to take action to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure that by 2030 all people enjoy peace and prosperity It includes 17 Sustainable Development Goals ( to which United Nations member states committed to achieve A total of 231 global indicators were also adopted as part of the new SDG framework to help countries to measure the progress towards achieving these objectives However, many countries lack the capacity to collect and analyse statistical data in a systematic manner To assist them with this task, each indicator has been assigned a custodian agency, which is responsible for collecting data from national sources, providing story lines for the annual global SDG progress report, updating documentation and underlying methodologies, and building country capacities to produce and report on these indicators, among other mandates A total of six SDGs are under the custodianship of FAO, among which SDG 2 that aims at ending hunger by 2030.

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