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Programme for the Second Regional Orientation Workshop on Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems(GIAHS)for Asia and the Pacific. 5-­‐7 May 2015 Bangkok, Thailand

Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)








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    Second Regional Orientation Workshop on Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems(GIAHS)for Asia and the Pacific 2014
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    The Asia-Pacific GIAHS workshop was the second in a series. The first Regional Workshop was conducted in November 2013. FAO acts as the GIAHS Secretariat, which based at FAO’s headquarters in Rome, Italy.
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    Regional Orientation Workshop on Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems(GIAHS)for Asia and the Pacific 2013
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    This Regional Workshop was conducted to enhance understanding of GIAHS concept and programme, share the experiences and lessons among the countries which have implemented GIAHS and those seeking to join the programme. The workshop also took advantage of reviewing the progress and achievements of overall GIAHS programme and the function of the GIAHS Secretariat as well as identification, assessment and designation process and the operational modalities of implementation in different countries.
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    Aohan Dryland Farming System. Proposal for the Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS) Programme
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    2011
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    Aohan County is located in the southeast of Chifeng City, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. It is the interface between China’s ancient farming culture and grassland culture. From 2001 to 2003, carbonized particles of foxtail and broomcorn millet were discovered by archaeologists in the “First Village of China”, Xinglongwa in Aohan County. These grains dating from 7700 to 8000 years ago are proved to be the earliest relics of cultivated foxtail and broomcorn millets known to the world. Be cause millets are grown on dryland slopes, their plant type is small, which makes it difficult to use mechanized farming methods. That’s why traditional techniques have prevailed until now. As a result, many skills and experiences have been accumulated over the long years of farming practice, and unique local dry farming cultures have been formed, including farming proverbs, food cultures and seasonal customs. These have been inherited for generations. Nevertheless, due to the effects of modern economic, social, and value changes, this traditional farming culture is facing threats and challenges from various sources. It is urgent to explore the values of this important system and protect itin a dynamic way.

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