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Revisiting garden-based learning in basic education:







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    Book (stand-alone)
    Revisiting Garden-Based Learning in Basic Education 2004
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    Garden-Based Learning for Improved Livelihoods and Nutrition Security of School Children in High HIV-Prevalence Areas in Southern Africa
    WORKSHOP REPORT PART I - II
    2007
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    School gardening is not a new concept, but it is ready for a new image, new directions and new values. It is currently experiencing a revival in the southern African region, where many children have been orphaned by AIDS. School gardens have the potential to strengthen school children’s knowledge and skills in food production and nutrition and to improve their nutrition security and livelihood prospects in the long term, both directly and through their influence on home gardens, home c ooking and family understanding of nutrition needs. Junior Farmer Field and Life Schools (JFFLS) are also emerging as an effective tool in several countries to address the learning and livelihood needs of out-ofschool youth as future farmers.
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    The Role of Agricultural Colleges and Universities in Rural Development and Lifelong Learning in Asia 2006
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    The paper expounds on the challenges confronting institutions of higher agricultural education (HAE) in the context of the significant role of education in alleviating poverty, especially in rural areas, and in light of the changing needs of rural areas and economies. Specifically, HAE institutions are called upon to initiate and lead in articulating a vision for the future that serves the needs not only of agriculture but also of all who inhabit the rural areas. They can step beyond their tradi tional role by merging forces with other stakeholders to enrich and support other levels of education with critical knowledge and information on agriculture and natural resources management (NRM), the latter being crucial in the pursuit of rural development, poverty reduction, and food security. To perform an active and constructive role in rural development, agricultural universities need to adjust their programs to accommodate new topics, as well as teaching and learning models; forge new pa rtnerships with schools, academia and rural space stakeholders; expand its representation in governance; and hold continuous dialogue with policymakers. Their extension services could include support to education for rural people that encompasses primary, secondary, vocational, and adult education. University-school linkages are perceived to be illustrative of a decentralized, democratic, and community-based response to rural development problems. It is noted that universities can potentially become showcases of local traditions and knowledge, reflecting the regional, cultural, and ethical traditions of their society, as well as global movements and forces. In reinforcing their roles as contributors to a culture of learning and rural development, it is emphasized that HAE institutions need to engage more directly and more effectively in partnerships and dialogue with other local educational institutions and their surrounding communities.

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