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FAW Guidance Note 2 - Fall Armyworm Scouting









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Technical guidance on fall armyworm
    Coordinated surveillance and an early warning system for the sustainable management of transboundary pests, with special reference to fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda [J.E. Smith]) in South and Southeast Asia
    2022
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    Worldwide, maize is the third most important cereal after rice and wheat. It occupies 197 million hectares of planted area. Asia contributes to nearly 30 percent of global maize supplies, and area and production of the crop is rapidly increasing in the continent. Minimum support prices, swelling market demand from the animal feed and processing industries, as well as human consumption, have all led to increased maize production in zones where precipitation limits rice cultivation. However, maize production is currently threatened by the arrival in Asia (in 2018) of the fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) – a native to North America. It invaded India in 2018 and since then it has marched to most of the Asian countries. In 2019, its presence was confirmed in 13 Asian countries including Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, and Viet Nam. In 2020, it was confirmed in Australia, Timor-Leste and Papua New Guinea. In August 2021, it reached the Solomon Islands, posing a serious threat to other Pacific islands. FAW is a fast-dispersing, migratory, transboundary insect pest. While high FAW incidences have been reported on several crops in Asia, the most important economic damage caused is to maize (followed by sorghum). The FAW invasion threatens the food security of millions of family farms in Asia, with smallholder farmers being especially vulnerable. The negative economic impact of FAW is not only evident in yield loss: the pest also leads to a significant increase in insecticide applications, with associated health, environmental and cost issues. At the same time, resilience to FAW on the continent is currently weakened by the limited access to necessary tools, technologies and sustainable integrated pest management (IPM) practices for FAW. Thus, there is an urgent need to implement an effective approach to FAW management in Asia.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Community-based fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) monitoring, early warning and management
    Training of trainers manual
    2019
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    Fall Armyworm (FAW) (Spodoptera frugiperda) was first reported in Africa in 2016. Since then, it has become a very destructive invasive pest in sub-Saharan Africa. Its main impact is on maize crops and affects different stages of growth, from early vegetative to physiological maturity. In several countries affected by FAW attack, farmer responses have been predominantly based on the use of chemical pesticides. It is important to ensure the safe use of such pesticides by farmers, but also to promote and deploy an integrated pest management (IPM) package against FAW. Farmers need the right advice, tools and resources to sustainably manage FAW. This manual provides farmers and extension service providers easy-to-use information on how they can manage FAW in smallholder cropping systems. It provides information about modules for training trainers in FAW pest diagnostics, scouting, management and data collection. The objective of this training is to provide trainers and farmers with the knowledge and skills that will enable them to identify FAW and differentiate it from other similar pests; understand the life cycle of FAW; and, know how to monitor and manage the pest. This manual gives trainers the information they need in order to support and sustain an IPM approach for FAW management in their communities. The manual is modular and allows for updates in the future as more knowledge and solutions to manage FAW become available.
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    Project
    Building Surveillance and Management Capacity to Effectively Respond to Fall Armyworm (FAW) in Tanzania - TCP/URT/3608 2021
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    Fall Armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda is an insect pest that feeds on more than 80 crop species, causing damage to such economically important crops as maize, rice, sorghum, paddy, legumes, vegetables and cotton, and leading to significant yield loss The United Republic of Tanzania is a leading producer of maize in East Africa region and the tenth producer in the world An estimated 6 59 million tonnes of maize are grown in the country each year by 4 5 million farm households, representing about 42 percent of Tanzanian farmers Primary outbreaks of FAW have been reported in Rukwa Kagera Pwani Geita Simiyu Mwanza, Morogoro Kilimanjaro and Njombe regions, with the Southern Highlands, the breadbasket of the country, and Southern regions also at high risk Because of the nature of FAW infestation, it is likely that the pest will colonize most African countries and have a negative impact on both food security and livelihoods.

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