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Good agricultural practices (GAP)

Green gram (Vigna radiata [L.] Wilczek)









FAO. 2024. Good agricultural practices (GAP) – Green gram (Vigna radiata [L.] Wilczek). Nay Pyi Taw.




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    Book (stand-alone)
    Good agricultural practices (GAP)
    Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.)
    2024
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    Groundnut, a significant oilseed crop in Myanmar, is predominantly cultivated by subsistence farmers in all the three regions of the Central Dry Zone. However, it has untapped potential for increased productivity, quality, and market competitiveness through improved crop technologies and the adoption of good agricultural practices (GAP). The adoption of GAP techniques, harmonious with natural agroecosystems and Indigenous Peoples' knowledge, including organic manuring, integrated pest management (IPM), and climate-resilient crop varieties, can be easily adopted by resource-poor farmers. Effective management of limited resources is achievable by careful selection and use of high-quality, environmentally safe inputs like seeds and fertilizers. The current emphasis on consumer awareness necessitates safe, quality food production and resource efficiency, emphasizing the need for better organization of groundnut growers through project-guided marketing to sustain productivity and increase income.Under the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations’ Global Agriculture and Food Security Climate-Friendly Agribusiness Value Chain (FAO-GAFSP-CFAVC) Programme, GAP dissemination for target crops, including groundnut, is a priority. This involves upgrading existing GAP standards based on Myanmar's and ASEAN's practices. The enhanced GAP version focuses on food safety, produce quality, worker health and safety, and environmental management. Implementing GAP will not only enhance food safety and quality but also promote ecological sustainability in groundnut production cropping systems.Validation and contextualization were achieved through comprehensive research, stakeholder discussions, and insights from relevant stakeholders, including FAO experts.GAP rollout involves capacity building among lead farmer organizations, public–private partners, and value chain actors. The framework covers pre- and post-harvest practices for safe, quality groundnut production tailored to small and medium farmers. Key messages facilitate agronomic management practices, supported by farmer organizations, sensitization, technical assistance, and market linkages. On-farm demonstrations, Farmer Field Schools (FFS), training, and information and communications technology (ICT) tools supplement GAP promotion.Existing user-friendly integrated pest management (IPM) handbooks and FFS curriculum for groundnut support the framework, leveraging farmers' capacity building and complementing affiliated GAP initiatives.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Good agricultural practices (GAP)
    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)
    2023
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    Chickpeas are vital for food security, nutrition, and farmer income in Myanmar's Central Dry Zone (CDZ), ranking second in South Asia after India. Collaborative research efforts of the Department of Agriculture Reform and the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (DAR-ICRISAT) have contributed to an eightfold increase in crop yield due to the introduction of more efficient varieties of chickpea in the country. Good agricultural practices (GAP) and value chain promotion of chickpea have significant potential which can further boost productivity and increase exports. The upgraded GAP standards of chickpea are inclusive of food safety, produce quality, worker health and safety, and environmental management aspects, as they were developed in a context-specific and participatory manner encompassing validation from farmers about the existing constraints in application of GAP. Dissemination and improved application of chickpea GAP is planned to be achieved through a comprehensive capacity-building programme of chickpea smallholder farmers, public–private partners, and value chain actors, at pre- and post-harvest levels. Strengthening lead farmers and crop producers’ organizations through technical support, improved demonstration and market linkages will leverage the objectives of GAP adoption and upscaling in the target regions. On-farm demonstrations, farmer field schools (FFS), training, and information and communications technology (ICT) tools will supplement GAP promotional interventions. User-friendly integrated pest management (IPM) handbooks and FFS curricula support farmers and existing GAP initiatives will foster the approach of climate-smart good agricultural practices at farmers' field level and will ensure the sustainability of farmers' income through increased productivity, product market competence and produce quality.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Good agricultural practices (GAP)
    Rice/Paddy (Oryza sativa)
    2023
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    Rice plays an important role in Myanmar's agricultural economy, livelihoods, and food security. The country possesses favourable conditions to enhance rice productivity, quality, and export opportunities across the value chain. Achieving this involves improving farm-level productivity, processing practices, and overall rice competitiveness. Effective strategies include adopting and expanding good agricultural practices (GAP) to enhance food safety and quality. Gaps in knowledge, access, and efficiency of inputs and services for rice were identified through a comprehensive GAP situational analysis. Validation was achieved through research, discussions with market actors and stakeholders as well as insights from FAO experts, and extensive data research. The objective of GAP dissemination involves a systematic, impact-oriented approach with stakeholder involvement. Context-specific information will be collected at the farmer's field. Capacity-building efforts involve lead farmer organizations, public–private partners, and value chain actors. The framework contains pre- and post-harvest practices tailored for small and medium farmers, supported by farmer organizations, sensitization, technical assistance, and market linkages. On-farm demonstrations, farmer field schools, training, and information and communications technology (ICT) tools supplement GAP promotion. User-friendly integrated pest management (IPM) handbooks and Farmer Field School (FFS) curricula complement the framework, guiding capacity-building efforts for farmers and GAP stakeholders to support and complement existing initiatives.

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