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ISPM 1. Phytosanitary principles for the protection of plants and the application of phytosanitary measures in international trade

Adopted 2006











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    Book (stand-alone)
    INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS FORPHYTOSANITARY MEASURES 1-27
    2006 Edition
    2006
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    This standard describes phytosanitary principles for the protection of plants that are embodied in the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) and elaborated in its International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures. It covers principles related to the protection of plants, including cultivated and non-cultivated/unmanaged plants, wild flora and aquatic plants, those regarding the application of phytosanitary measures to the international movement of people, commodities and conv eyances, as well as those inherent in the objectives of the IPPC. The standard does not alter the IPPC, extend existing obligations, or interpret any other agreement or body of law.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Regional status of pest surveillance in the context of ISPM No. 6: International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures – Guidelines for Pest Surveillance
    Analysis of the responses to the Implementation Review and Support System (IRSS) questionnaire from APPPC countries
    2012
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    An fundamental activity of national plant protection organizations is to conduct pest surveillance. For the purpose of international trade, the results of pest surveillance provide the basis for pest listing, identification of pest status, pest categorization and the conduct of pest risk analyses. In 1997, the International Plant Protection Convention issued the International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM) No. 6: Guidelines for surveillance to assist national organizations in the imp lementation of this critical activity. In 2011, it was decided to review these guidelines and identify challenges faced by the contracting parties for implementation, as well as identify resources for resolving those challenges. At the request of the Standards Committee of the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC), the Implementation Review and Support System will catalogue the challenges faced and make recommendations to the review panel of ISPM No. 6 on ways to improve the standard. It will also gather examples of best practices globally so that appropriate training materials and manuals might be prepared under the capacity development programme of the IPPC. For the purpose of this review, a questionnaire was developed and distributed among national plant protection organizations. Seventeen countries from Asia and the Pacific region responded to this call and completed the questionnaire, composed of three parts: the questionnaire, technical resources and best practices. Th e results from the survey were compiled and analyzed, and are presented in this publication, which reflects the current status of pest surveillance in the region. Conclusions and recommendations are included in the report.
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    Project
    Support for the Enhancement of National Plant Pest Surveillance and Phytosanitary Certification Systems - TCP/RER/3705 2022
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    For Armenia, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, North Macedonia, Republic of Moldova and Ukraine, plant protection in agriculture and forestry is important for food safety and economic development Not only do plants ensure sustainable nutrition for society, but they also support international trade in plants or plant products As plants are hosts for many pests, international trade is inherently associated with risks of pest introduction and spread National phytosanitary systems based on the International Plant Protection Convention ( and International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures ( aim at reducing those risks Even though the ISPMs are available on the website of the IPPC, National Plant Protection Organizations ( often have insufficient knowledge of them In practice, this may translate into difficulties in discussions with other NPPOs, especially on trade related issues Moreover, as ISPMs are revised and updated, especially to reflect new scientific achievements, periodic training is necessary to keep NPPOs and their officers informed about recent developments The main objective of this project was to enhance the capacities of the national phytosanitary systems operated by the NPPOs of the recipient countries to better prevent the risks associated with the introduction and spread of pests that can occur through international trade in plants and plant products Among the key elements of national phytosanitary systems are surveillance systems, which enable reliable determination of the presence or absence of pests in the territories or parts of territories of countries, early detection of newly introduced pests and determination of areas of their spread within the country Monitoring surveys are used to verify the characteristics of pest populations within countries, enabling timely reaction and the prevention of economic damage to crops The project built the capacities of the NPPOs in the participating countries on the identification of pests and on phytosanitary certificates through the delivery of training sessions These were based on international standards adopted under the IPPC, which provide guidance for NPPOs around the world on the harmonization of their actions to combat plant pests for international trade in plants and plant products.

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