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Anticipating El Niño: Mitigation, preparedness and response plan for Southern Africa, 2023–2025








FAO. 2023. Anticipating El Niño: Mitigation, preparedness and response plan for Southern Africa, 2023–2025. Rome.




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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Anticipating El Niño: A mitigation, preparedness and response plan 2023
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    FAO’s El Niño Mitigation, Preparedness and Response Plan is an urgent appeal to be implemented in close collaboration with government partners and other humanitarian actors in Somalia. The plan complements the 2023 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP), which focuses on drought recovery as the international community in Somalia seeks to support the 6.6 million people facing acute food insecurity due to drought and conflict. Within this context, FAO has identified a new threat to lives and livelihoods in the country in the form of a ‘Super El Niño’, the conjunction of two weather events that poses new challenges for Somalia in the coming months. The plan aims to save lives and help communities and institutions better absorb the impact of flooding on their livelihoods. The plan responds to four overarching priority needs in riverine communities and surrounding areas (1) early warning information, (2) flood defence infrastructure, (3) preparedness & coordination and (4) safeguarding livelihoods.
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    Book (series)
    Evaluation of FAO’s contribution to building resilience to El Niño-induced drought in Southern Africa 2016-2017 2020
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    During the 2015–2016 agricultural season, Southern Africa experienced intense drought due to one of the strongest El Niño events in 50 years. With 70 percent of the population reliant on agriculture, El Niño had a direct impact on food security and caused loss of income across crop and livestock value chains. FAO activated a corporate surge support and launched its Southern Africa El Niño Response Plan, appealing for USD 109 million to support government efforts to rebuild and fortify agricultural livelihoods, restoring agricultural production, incomes and assets and increasing household access to nutritious food. FAO country teams translated the regional plan into tailored intervention packages on the ground. But while agro-meteorological and early-warning alerts were timely, they did not trigger early action. The evaluation calls on FAO to initiate a systematic approach to adaptive programming, to conduct an in-depth analysis of the factors that slowed delivery in Southern Africa, to expand on the targeting of different groups, so as to meet the needs of farmers with varying degrees of vulnerability, and to bolster learning, information-sharing and advocacy efforts across countries.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO Southern Africa El Niño Response Plan 2016
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    The El Niño phenomenon poses a global threat to the agricultural livelihoods of millions of people. In Southern Africa, over 39 million people are now food insecure due to the impacts of El Niño, which have been felt across all sectors — food and nutrition security, agriculture (both crops and livestock), water and sanitation, energy, health and education. The poor 2015/16 agricultural season, compounded by last year’s poor harvest that left only two countries with surplus food to export, has g reatly affected the food and nutrition security of millions of people. The lean season is expected to continue through April 2017, which will have a cumulative eroding effect on the production capacities of farmers in the 2016/17 agricultural season. With 70 percent of the population in the region depending on agriculture for their livelihood, these same people not only produce food for themselves, but for the entire subregion. Supporting these farmers will be crucial to avoiding protracted reli ef operations and increased vulnerability, which can lead to migration as income and labour opportunities cease to exist. This document provides a brief overview of the impact of El Niño on agricultural livelihoods in Southern Africa, along with funding needs and priorties for FAO action in the region.

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