Thumbnail Image

FAO COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme - Global Humanitarian Response Plan

Addressing the impacts of COVID-19 and safeguarding livelihoods in food crisis contexts











​FAO. 2020. FAO COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme: Global Humanitarian Response Plan: Addressing the impacts of COVID-19 and safeguarding livelihoods in food crisis contexts. Rome.




Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Addressing the impacts of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in food crises (April–December 2020)
    FAO’s component of the Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19 (July update)
    2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The world is standing on the precipice of the greatest food crisis in generations. Worldwide, people and their communities are reeling from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, which extend far beyond the direct health impacts. Food systems have been disrupted, informal employment all but stopped for millions, markets have closed and remittances have dried up and the most vulnerable have found themselves struggling to access sufficient food. Increasingly, as smallholders are unable to access the critical inputs they need to continue producing, food availability is emerging as a major concern. Conflict, weather extremes and pre-existing economic turbulence continue to push more people into acute hunger, exacerbated by the reverberations of the pandemic. The worst-case scenario of famine is inching closer to reality for millions of girls, boys, women and men, especially for the 27 million people that were already experiencing emergency levels of acute hunger before the pandemic. Responding to these challenges requires urgent action at scale. Critical agricultural seasons, livestock movements for pasture and water, food harvesting, processing and storage – these are not activities that can be put on hold as we tackle the health impacts of the pandemic. Without support, increasing numbers of people will be forced to abandon their livelihoods and rely on much more costly food assistance to survive. Anticipatory action now is not just more cost effective than waiting to rebuild livelihoods and communities later, it is more humane and respectful of the dignity of the billions of people relying on some form of agriculture for their livelihoods. This is at the heart of FAO’s response to the indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. FAO’s programme focuses on four key components to save lives and livelihoods threatened by the pandemic, as follows: (i) rolling out data collection and analysis; (ii) ensuring availability of and stabilizing access to food for the most acutely food-insecure populations; (iii) ensuring continuity of the critical food supply chain for the most vulnerable populations; and (iv) ensuring food supply chain actors are not at risk of virus transmission.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    South Sudan | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020)
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Despite a period of relative stability since the signing of the Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan (R-ARCSS) in September 2018, more than 6.5 million people are experiencing acute food insecurity at crisis or worse levels across the country (Integrated Food Security Phase Classification [IPC], January 2020). This is due to the cumulative effects of years of conflict and asset depletion, low crop production, climatic and economic shocks, limited access to basic services and the resultant increase in vulnerability and reduction in resilience. Almost 4 million people remain displaced, both internally and as refugees in neighbouring countries. This situation is exacerbated by COVID-19, which has indirectly disrupted food availability and increased food prices, as well as the surging and re-surging desert locust outbreak in the Horn of Africa, all of which are threatening the already fragile food security and nutrition situation in South Sudan. In the framework of FAO’s Corporate COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme and the United Nations Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19, FAO has revised its humanitarian response for 2020 to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and address the needs of the most vulnerable households.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Call for action to avert famine in 2021 2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The number of people experiencing acute food insecurity has remained persistently above 100 million over the last four years. In 2019, the figure rose sharply to 135 million across 58 countries, driven by more conflict, climate extremes and economic turbulence. This number has since significantly increased including due to the compounding effect of the COVID-19 pandemic. While the next Global Report on Food Crises will be launched in April 2021 by the Global Network Against Food Crises, a dramatic increase in the numbers of people in acute food insecurity is evident through new Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) analyses or similar analytical processes in countries where the IPC/Cadre Harmonisé (CH) analyses have not been undertaken, with 174 million people in IPC Phase 3 or worse in the 58 countries covered. Of absolute urgent and imminent concern today are more than 34 million people in IPC Phase 4 across the world who already face emergency levels of acute food insecurity and are highly vulnerable to face famine or famine-like conditions without urgent immediate life-saving action.The situation requires urgent action at scale. By the time famine is declared many lives will already be lost; the wider impact on child development, poverty and people’s lives will endure for years to come; and the stripping of productive livelihood assets will increase dependence on external assistance. Within this Call for Action, FAO and WFP are urgently seeking USD 5.5 billion to swiftly scale up actions to avert famine through a combination of humanitarian food assistance, cash and emergency livelihoods interventions.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.